About

 

The  Capital Area Food Network is community-led organization of Wake County citizens working together to support, sustain, and improve our local food system. We always welcome new voices and volunteers interested in helping reach our mission:

To cultivate healthy individuals, communities, and economies through vibrant food and farm systems.

The Capital Area Food Network is not alone - there are many food councils developing in North Carolina and around the nation. We connect with other councils regionally and at the state level to share policy agendas, best practices, and stories of success.

 
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Our structure

CAFN is organized into multiple circles that each take on a different part of the food system: food access, farm advocacy, food recovery, policy, communiactions, and fundraising. These individuals circles are connected through our Coordinating Circle, a central group that helps set overall strategy and direction. Our structure is based on principles of dynamic governance, and there is always room for new members and focus areas.

The Capital Area Food Network is registered as an NC non-profit, with fiscal sponsorship provided by the Food Bank of Central and Eastern NC.

 
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our volunteers 

Despite their diverse background, CAFN volunteers share one common goal: support the Wake County food system. Our organization includes passionate Wake County citizens and local food champions involved in all aspects of our food system - farmers, entrepreneurs, scientists, nonprofit professionals, educators, and people who just love food! Want to join us? Let us know! Anyone living or working in Wake County is welcome.

 
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our history

CAFN was developed out of the Raleigh Wake Urban Agriculture Working Group, a grassroots coalition interested in integrating urban agriculture into the City of Raleigh’s zoning code. Following the work of this urban ag group, a community-wide interest meeting was held in 2013 to discuss extending the community-based food policy collaborative that had emerged.

This interest meeting led to an 18-month task force phase led by a group of 12 passionate volunteers from various backgrounds, with expert facilitation by the Center for Environmental Farming Systems. This task force developed the groundwork for the creation of The Capital Area Food Network, which launched in 2015 at a community meeting held at The Irregardless Cafe in Raleigh.

Board of Directors

Organization Partners